Institut Marie Curie

Awarded 6 Nobel Prizes, Institut Curie has been at the forefront of the fight against cancer since 1909

C3Medical is proud to manage the international patients of Institut Curie.

Based in Paris on 3 locations, the Institut Curie is a private non-profit foundation and one of the leading medical, biological and biophysical research centers in the world.  

Since its foundation in 1909 Institut Curie brings together on the same site both medical and research teams, and was the first of its kind to operate in this way.

This co-working team collaboration led to the introduction of major innovations such as radio-therapy in the 1920s, one of the first hospitals in the world to operate a proton-therapy center in 1991, and more recently, with the use of artificial intelligence, DNA research and immunotherapy. 

HISTORY

The Institut du Radium, a giant laboratory for Marie Curie, was founded in 1909 by the University of Paris and Institut Pasteur. 

The Institut du Radium had 2 divisions

  • The Curie laboratory, directed by Marie Curie, was dedicated to physics and chemistry research

  • The Pasteur laboratory, directed by Dr. Claudius Regaud, was studying the biological and medical effects of radioactivity

After receiving a joint Nobel Prize with her husband Pierre in 1903, Marie Curie won a second Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1911. During World War One, Marie Curie used her celebrity to teach nurses about radiology and raise funds to fit ambulances with radiology equipment.
Marie Curie and Dr. Claudius Regaud established the Fondation Curie in 1920, a public-interest institution. 

The Foundation’s purpose was to fund the Institut du Radium’s activities and contribute to the development of its therapeutic activities. 
A first hospital opened in 1922, where Dr. Regaud and his team developed the first treatments combining surgery and radiation therapy to treat cancer. 

The Curie Foundation became the first cancer hospital and a model for cancer centers around the world. 
Curie laboratory continued to play an important role in physics and chemistry research. In 1934, Marie Curie's daughter Irène and her son-in-law Frédéric Joliot-Curie discovered artificial radioactivity. In 1935, this breakthrough was awarded a Nobel Prize in Chemistry. 

The Institut du Radium and the Fondation Curie merged in 1970. It became Institut Curie, specialized around 3 missions: research, teaching and treating cancer.

In total, 6 Nobel prizes have been awarded to the Institut Curie research teams:

  • Marie Curie, Physics, 1903

  • Pierre Curie, Physics, 1903

  • Marie Curie. Chemistry, 1911

  • Irène Joliot-Curie, Chemistry, 1935

  • Frédéric Joliot-Curie, Chemistry, 1935

  • Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, Physics, 1991

RESEACH CENTER & TEACHING

Institut Curie now operates several research units in cooperation with national research institutions - such as CNRS (National Scientific Research Center), INSERM (National Heath and Medicine Research Center) -, with European and international institutions.

The international staff is 1,100 strong, divided into 86 teams. 

In 2016, Insitut Curie researchers have produced 777 publications, conducted 31 European high-tech research projects in different fields:  

  • Genetics and Epigenetics
  • Molecular Biology of the Cell
  • Development and Cancer
  • Physical Chemistry of Cells
  • Immunotherapies of Cancers
  • Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
  • Biology & Chemistry of Radiations
  • Cell Signaling and Cancer 
  • Imaging: from molecules to living organism
  • Tumor Biology-Immunology-Microenvironment
  • Physics-Biology-Chemistry and Cancer

HOSPITAL

Institut Curie hospital is exclusively dedicated to cancer treatment, by radiotherapy, proton-therapy, surgery and chemo therapy, with 365 beds and 86 chemotherapy treatment chairs.

The Institut Curie runs the Claudius Régaud hospital with some 2,100 doctors and medical assistants and, since 1991, a proton therapy center. 

The proton therapy center, located in Orsay, South of Paris, is one of the few and the earliest of such facilities to operate in the world. In terms of activity, it is ranked N°1 for ophthalmologic cancers and N°4 for all types of cancers, 

While treating all types of cancers, Institut Curie hospital’s core excellence deals with:

  • Pediatric cancers
  • Eye tumors
  • Breast cancers
  • Lung cancers
  • Complex sarcomas surgery

In 2016, the hospital welcomed 51,486 patients of 79 different nationalities.

NUCLEAR MEDICINE INFRASTRUCTURE

Institut Curie gathers state-of-the-art equipment such as

  • 12 accelerators
  • 10 imaging devices
  • 5 nuclear medicine devices
  • 3 proton therapy units with automatic loaders and robots 

PROTON-THERAPY CENTER

Fitted treatment rooms

In operation for almost 3 decades (1991), the CPO (Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay) has 3 treatment rooms: 

  • One for ophthalmological and intra-cranial treatments, where the patient is seated; 
  • One for intra-cranial treatments, where the patient is reclined or seated; 
  • One for intra-cranial locations and/or other parts of the body, equipped with an isocentric arm for treatments in the reclining position,

In the first two treatment rooms - where the proton beam is fixed and horizontal -, the patient is placed on a table or chair, depending on the beam. 

In order to be able to choose the placement of the beam in relation to the lesion, the patient is placed on a table or robotized chair for ultra-precise positioning.

The room with the isocentric arm lets the beam move 360°. As the patient reclines on a treatment table, the beam is then positioned very precisely.

The proton accelerator

The proton accelerator is a circular accelerator, known as a cyclotron. 

The proton source – hydrogen plasma – is located at the center of the acceleration chamber. 

The protons are accelerated using an intense electrical field reaching 230 MeV (million electrovolts) before being channeled in a vacuum to the treatment rooms.

The physical advantage and clinical benefit of protons

The benefit of protons is essentially ballistic. 

The proton is a heavily charged particle, which deposits its energy along its trajectory before stopping suddenly at a certain point and delivering a high energy charge.

Beyond this point, the dose is almost zero. The proton tends to go straight and sideways diffusion is low, so that the dose delivered to the tissues surrounding the tumor is slight. 

It is possible to achieve the optimum dose to the tumor without exceeding the maximum admissible dose to the healthy, sensitive adjacent tissues, helping reduce the risk of deferred side effects occurring several weeks to several years after radiation.

Source: Institut Curie website – 2019_06_14
 

HISTORY

The Institut du Radium, a giant laboratory for Marie Curie, was founded in 1909 by the University of Paris and Institut Pasteur. 

The Institut du Radium had 2 divisions

  • The Curie laboratory, directed by Marie Curie, was dedicated to physics and chemistry research
  • The Pasteur laboratory, directed by Dr. Claudius Regaud, was studying the biological and medical effects of radioactivity

After receiving a joint Nobel Prize with her husband Pierre in 1903, Marie Curie won a second Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1911. During World War One, Marie Curie used her celebrity to teach nurses about radiology and raise funds to fit ambulances with radiology equipment.
Marie Curie and Dr. Claudius Regaud established the Fondation Curie in 1920, a public-interest institution. 

The Foundation’s purpose was to fund the Institut du Radium’s activities and contribute to the development of its therapeutic activities. 
A first hospital opened in 1922, where Dr. Regaud and his team developed the first treatments combining surgery and radiation therapy to treat cancer. 

The Curie Foundation became the first cancer hospital and a model for cancer centers around the world. 
Curie laboratory continued to play an important role in physics and chemistry research. In 1934, Marie Curie's daughter Irène and her son-in-law Frédéric Joliot-Curie discovered artificial radioactivity. In 1935, this breakthrough was awarded a Nobel Prize in Chemistry. 

The Institut du Radium and the Fondation Curie merged in 1970. It became Institut Curie, specialized around 3 missions: research, teaching and treating cancer.

In total, 6 Nobel prizes have been awarded to the Institut Curie research teams:

  • Marie Curie, Physics, 1903
  • Pierre Curie, Physics, 1903
  • Marie Curie. Chemistry, 1911
  • Irène Joliot-Curie, Chemistry, 1935
  • Frédéric Joliot-Curie, Chemistry, 1935
  • Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, Physics, 1991

RESEACH CENTER & TEACHING

Institut Curie now operates several research units in cooperation with national research institutions - such as CNRS (National Scientific Research Center), INSERM (National Heath and Medicine Research Center) -, with European and international institutions.

The international staff is 1,100 strong, divided into 86 teams. 

In 2016, Insitut Curie researchers have produced 777 publications, conducted 31 European high-tech research projects in different fields:  

  • Genetics and Epigenetics
  • Molecular Biology of the Cell
  • Development and Cancer
  • Physical Chemistry of Cells
  • Immunotherapies of Cancers
  • Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
  • Biology & Chemistry of Radiations
  • Cell Signaling and Cancer 
  • Imaging: from molecules to living organism
  • Tumor Biology-Immunology-Microenvironment
  • Physics-Biology-Chemistry and Cancer

HOSPITAL

Institut Curie hospital is exclusively dedicated to cancer treatment, by radiotherapy, proton-therapy, surgery and chemo therapy, with 365 beds and 86 chemotherapy treatment chairs.

The Institut Curie runs the Claudius Régaud hospital with some 2,100 doctors and medical assistants and, since 1991, a proton therapy center. 

The proton therapy center, located in Orsay, South of Paris, is one of the few and the earliest of such facilities to operate in the world. In terms of activity, it is ranked N°1 for ophthalmologic cancers and N°4 for all types of cancers, 

While treating all types of cancers, Institut Curie hospital’s core excellence deals with:

  • Pediatric cancers
  • Eye tumors
  • Breast cancers
  • Lung cancers
  • Complex sarcomas surgery

In 2016, the hospital welcomed 51,486 patients of 79 different nationalities.

NUCLEAR MEDICINE INFRASTRUCTURE

Institut Curie gathers state-of-the-art equipment such as

  • 12 accelerators
  • 10 imaging devices
  • 5 nuclear medicine devices
  • 3 proton therapy units with automatic loaders and robots 

PROTON-THERAPY CENTER

Fitted treatment rooms

In operation since almost 3 decades (1991), the CPO (Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay) has 3 treatment rooms: 

  • One for ophthalmological and intra-cranial treatments, where the patient is seated; 
  • One for intra-cranial treatments, where the patient is reclining or seated; 
  • One for intra-cranial locations and/or other parts of the body, equipped with an isocentric arm for treatments in the reclining position,

In the first two treatment rooms - where the proton beam is fixed and horizontal -, the patient is placed on a table or chair, depending on the beam. 

In order to be able to choose the placement of the beam in relation to the lesion, the patient is placed on a table or robotized chair for ultra-precise positioning.

The room with the isocentric arm lets the beam move 360°. As the patient reclines on a treatment table, the beam is then positioned very precisely.

The proton accelerator

The proton accelerator is a circular accelerator, known as a cyclotron. 

The proton source – hydrogen plasma – is located at the center of the acceleration chamber. 

The protons are accelerated using an intense electrical field reaching 230 MeV (million electrovolts) before being channeled in a vacuum to the treatment rooms.

The physical advantage and clinical benefit of protons

The benefit of protons is essentially ballistic. 

The proton is a heavily charged particle, which deposits its energy along its trajectory before stopping suddenly at a certain point and delivering a high energy charge.

Beyond this point, the dose is almost zero. The proton tends to go straight and sideways diffusion is low, so that the dose delivered to the tissues surrounding the tumor is slight. 

It is possible to achieve the optimum dose to the tumor without exceeding the maximum admissible dose to the healthy, sensitive adjacent tissues, helping reduce the risk of deferred side effects occurring several weeks to several years after radiation.

Source: Institut Curie website – 2019_06_14